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Thomas M. Geier, CPA, CFP®, PFS

new contribution limits for 2018

With the signing of the new tax law, some taxpayers have found some extra cash in their paychecks.  Rather than spend this new-found money, an opportunity exists to add to retirement accounts and save more for the future. The Internal Revenue Service recently announced cost of living adjustments, affecting dollar limitations for retirement-related items for tax year 2018, allowing some higher contributions.  Detailed in Notice 2017-64, here are the excerpts directly from the IRS:

Highlights of Changes for 2018

The contribution limit for employees who participate in 401(k), 403(b), most 457 plans, and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plan is increased from $18,000 to $18,500.

The income ranges for determining eligibility to make deductible contributions to traditional Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs), to contribute to Roth IRAs and to claim the saver’s credit all increased for 2018.

Taxpayers can deduct contributions to a traditional IRA if they meet certain conditions. If during the year either the taxpayer or their spouse was covered by a retirement plan at work, the deduction may be reduced, or phased out, until it is eliminated, depending on filing status and income. (If neither the taxpayer nor their spouse is covered by a retirement plan at work, the phase-outs of the deduction do not apply.) Here are the phase-out ranges for 2018:

  • For single taxpayers covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is $63,000 to $73,000, up from $62,000 to $72,000.
  • For married couples filing jointly, where the spouse making the IRA contribution is covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is $101,000 to $121,000, up from $99,000 to $119,000.
  • For an IRA contributor who is not covered by a workplace retirement plan and is married to someone who is covered, the deduction is phased out if the couple’s income is between $189,000 and $199,000, up from $186,000 and $196,000.
  • For a married individual filing a separate return who is covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $0 to $10,000.

The income phase-out range for taxpayers making contributions to a Roth IRA is $120,000 to $135,000 for singles and heads of household, up from $118,000 to $133,000.

For married couples filing jointly, the income phase-out range is $189,000 to $199,000, up from $186,000 to $196,000.

The phase-out range for a married individual filing a separate return who makes contributions to a Roth IRA is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $0 to $10,000.

The income limit for the Saver’s Credit(also known as the Retirement Savings Contributions Credit) for low-and-moderate-income workers is $63,000 for married couples filing jointly, up from $62,000; $47,250 for heads of household, up from $46,500; and $31,500 for singles and married individuals filing separately, up from $31,000.

Limitations that Remain Unchanged from 2017

  • The limit on annual contributions to an IRA remains unchanged at $5,500. The additional catch-up contribution limit for individuals aged 50 and over is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $1,000.
  • The catch-up contribution limit for employees aged 50 and over who participate in 401(k), 403(b), most 457 plans and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plan remains unchanged at $6,000.

Please feel free to call us at Geier Asset Management with any questions on how these new contribution limits may offer opportunities for you.

 

Sources: RSW Publishing and Financial Media Exchange.

© Geier Asset Management, Inc.  April 2018.   Thomas M. Geier is a Vice President of Geier Asset Management, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.   The above blog reflects the opinions of Mr. Geier and not necessarily the firm.  Any advice given is general in nature and investors must consider their own individual circumstances.  Past performance is no indicator of future performance.